The Future of Synthetic Food

The Future of Synthetic Food

We’re in a time and place where nut milks and natural sweeteners are the norm. Born out of the desire for alternatives, the food system is constantly being pushed forward by innovations. Synthetic is on the opposite side of the spectrum from organically grown, but there’s enough drive behind some of these products to shift perceptions about these man-made foods. Meat alternatives have been on the rise, showcasing largely unheard of ingredients that rival the texture of meat, shoving aside the soy laden options that dominated pre-prepared vegan fare for so long. Yet, there hasn’t been a bonafide replacement for the taste and texture that natural meat offers… Until now. Enter “clean meat”. Memphis Meats Inc. is by stepping the need to raise and slaughter livestock by creating a meat with cell cultures. Producing this at a mass scale would mitigate the issues that the current meat industry struggles with today, such as energy and water usage, as well as food safety. This new meat is slated to be similar in cost to traditional meat. Wine is an ancient and beloved drink. Today, its scale of production taps into a lot of precious resources to grow the grapes from which it is made. Ava Winery is producing synthetic wine that comes with all the fragrance and alcoholic buzz as your favorite wine, but that uses a fraction of the resources that natural wine does. The company advocates for transparency, sustainability and cost efficiency. While synthetic food businesses are seeing a bright future, companies are experimenting in other innovative ways to shift what food can do. Miso paste is traditionally...
Beyond The Shoreline Reimagines Seaweed Snacking

Beyond The Shoreline Reimagines Seaweed Snacking

At the mention of eating seaweed, the strips of nori which cradle our sushi rolls immediately come to mind. As do those strangely textured, crunchy yet melt in your mouth roasted seaweed sheets. As a the main ingredient of a gourmet dish, or a go-to protein rich snack? Hardly. Seaweed has long been overlooked as a viable food source in America, but is now fighting its way into superfood status. The Future of Farming is in the Ocean Industrialized fishing has taken a toll on ecosystems of the ocean, chasing fish away and leaving fisherman jobless. That’s what led Bren Smith to found Greenwave, an initiative which works to train unemployed fisherman into sea farmers who grow different kinds of seaweed and shellfish. These restorative species provide a highly sustainable form of food production, and positively impact ocean conditions by soaking up carbon and nitrogen that threaten aquatic ecosystems. Inspired by this, Beyond the Shoreline has begun creating innovative kelp based snacks that step outside the nori sheet box. Their first product, kelp jerky, has yet to be released but promises to sidestep the issue of appetite appeal. The American palate may not yet be prepared to embrace the slimy, fish flavored plant at face value, so moving forward with a familiar form of snack is a huge step in the right direction. But what’s spurring the movement to bring this abundant crop from ocean to table in the first place? Good for You Kelp, the unlikely hero of the sea, has more to offer than expected. “Nori contains more vitamin C than orange juice, more calcium than milk, and more protein than soybeans. And it might surprise those of us on the hunt for...
Interact Work at Fancy Foods Show 2017

Interact Work at Fancy Foods Show 2017

When we attended this year’s Summer Fancy Foods show, we were proud to witness several of our very own clients showcasing fresh new packaging design. Keep an eye out for these fantastic products rolling out in stores this year! ONE CULTURE FOODS   FATTY SUNDAYS     BOW TIES TILLEN FARMS BIENA 4505 MEATS   MAMA GERALDINE’S REVO MODERN MILL WANDERING...
Trends Spotted in the Netherlands

Trends Spotted in the Netherlands

Ever wonder what the inside of a shop inside Amsterdam looks like? Now you can get a little taste! Our intern Sydney took a trip to the Netherlands recently, and she took some snaps of awesome packaging that she saw. Here are a couple trends she spotted abroad. JUST ADD ______   There were a lot of pre-packaged goods that combined ingredients for ready made drinks and snacks. Teas with sweetener loaded onto a spoon waiting to be mixed into a cup of hot water were a favorite. “Festival in a Bottle” was an innovative way to add some excitement to a plain bottle of liquor with dehydrated fruits and spices. And for a delightfully simple mix-it-yourself refreshment, there were kits that included everything you’d need for a fresh gin & tonic.     QUITE THE CHARACTER The Dutch are embracing bright and bold colors, in contrast the modern packaging we typically see in the States. These eye-catching hues were seen in shelves all over stores. There were chocolate bars that sported vibrant, contrasting patterns that worked together in perfect chaos. In addition, there were a lot of whimsical illustrations and characters – even in products that aren’t necessarily marketed toward children. The shifty eyes on bottles of Karma Kombucha couldn’t be ignored when walking past the refrigerated section!      IN THE SPIRIT OF TRANSPARENCY One trend that’s clearly a hit across cultures is transparency – both in the literal, visual execution of packaging solutions, but also in the key messaging that brands are sending. The desire to eat “clean” has spurred a movement that pushes companies to lay everything out on the table – particularly ingredients. It...
Organic Snacking Reaches New Heights

Organic Snacking Reaches New Heights

Organic is a term synonymous with fresh, high quality foods that are free of harmful additives. Over the last twenty years, the consumer demand for organic foods has steadily increased, and thus the range of available options has grown exponentially. In fact, it’s one of the fastest growing segments of the food industry, with sales growing from $3.7 billion in 1997 to more than $43 billion in 2015, according to a recent report by the The Environmental Working Group. The fresh food spaces like dairy and produce have contributed quite a bit to this, because they are staples we can easily imagine making that “farm to table” transition. Yet, one of the most highly demanded organic categories right now is snacks. Lots of on-the-go snacking options are highly processed – the ingredients required to preserve, color and flavor them are often a far cry from natural, let alone organic. However, busy lifestyles with a health conscious mindset have set the desire for quick and healthy food options at an all time high.   Ahead of the Game The organic snacking movement gained a lot of its momentum in the form of small companies with big personalities, often breaking away from their conventional competitors with unique offerings.  There continues to be a huge space for these types of brands. Hippeas are satisfyingly crunchy and savory snack featuring an unconventional chief ingredient: chickpeas. Similarly, Barnana pushes boundaries with good-for-you indulgence in the form of “upcycled bananas”. Both are focused on sustainability and conscious eating. By consistently finding ways to bring unique options to the table, companies are keeping organic as fresh...
The Power of the Word “Farms” in Brands

The Power of the Word “Farms” in Brands

Tesco has re-branded some of of their meat and produce products with a new range of “farm” names. The controversy is that the “farm” names used are either completely fabricated or are derived from a farm that has nothing to do with the product. The seven new brands consist of produce, beef, and poultry. This change in marketing was implemented in hopes to improve consumers’ perception of the quality and freshness of their products. This marketing practice isn’t unique to Tesco, considering Target has been doing something similar with the Archer Farms brand. European supermarket Aldi has been doing the same with their Ashfield brand. Supermarket companies have learned that the consumers associate the word “farm” with quality and freshness. “…retail consultant Alison Pike said that the new branding was well positioned. The word ‘farm’ will give a perception of quality and a perception of provenance for the product itself.” (Marketing Magazine) For Tesco, this change was directly attributed to the fact that their store brand products were known for their poor quality resulting in customers to avoid them. “Bill Grimsey, … who worked for Tesco in the 1980s as its first customer services director, said that improving the perception of value was a particular challenge in fresh food…” (Marketing Magazine) This negative perception put pressure on Tesco to change their methods. “… the policy comes as supermarkets are under increasing pressure to improve transparency and provide information about where its food comes from.” (Independent) While some of the names are completely made up, a few are real farms and businesses. The owner of Boswell Farm, which supplies holiday...