Interact Category Specialists: Cereal & Granola

Interact Category Specialists: Cereal & Granola

Just when consumers are beginning to feel they have seen it all in the cereal and granola world, brands, as well as celebrity chefs, are coming out with new ways to flip the category on it’s head. Certain brands are making strides toward healthier options, ingredient transparency and the use of food byproducts as part of their formulations, while others are actually amplifying these traditional breakfast foods to be more indulgent than ever. (Kashi) TRANSPARENCY Cereal and granola don’t have the best reputation when it comes to a clean ingredient list, especially relating to sugar content. However, brands such as Kashi, and RX Bar are on a mission to prove that they aren’t afraid to show what their products are made of. In a recent redesign, Kashi decided to use close-up photos of their cereal and granola bars on their boxes to show how real their products are. Additionally, their granola bars are wrapped in a clear sleeve so the individual ingredients can be seen through the window on the front of the box. Aside from visually highlighting the product to relay ingredient transparency, boldly listing the individual ingredients can instill confidence in consumers that they can trust what they are eating. RX Bar utilizes a straightforward list of ingredients on their packaging to show consumers how clean and simple their products are. The last line of every list states “No B.S.”, which is one additional way of communicating their clean formulation.   (Regrained) FOOD BY-PRODUCTS As the concern surrounding food waste continues to grow, a few young brands have begun to play their part in utilizing food byproducts...
The Growth of Nut and Seed Butters

The Growth of Nut and Seed Butters

Peanut butter is a classic protein packed snack that’s versatile enough to be combined with just about anything. For a long time, it was the only kind of nut butter that people knew of. With constantly evolving consumer dietary needs, we’ve seen a boom in “butters” made from all kinds of different nuts and seeds. Here are a few aspects of this growing category that brands are taking into account: Source PRESENTATION The demand for peanut butter alternatives has resulted in an influx of “butters” made from ground almonds, cashews, pistachios and more. Often at a higher price point, it is common to see companies touting the healthy benefits of their product. Nutraw’s pistachio butter features packaging that is more elevated than what you might associate with a typical peanut butter jar, reflecting the minimal ingredients (stripped down to just pistachios, coconut oil and vanilla). Similarly, butters are increasingly being made from seeds – even ones you may not have ever thought to eat. Sunflower and pumpkin seed butters have been heralded as friendly options for consumers with nut allergies. Watermelon seed butter is unconventional yet intriguing. Sakara’s version appeals to consumers based on its aesthetic alone. The cream colored product is complemented by equally clean packaging, suggesting its simplicity and quality. Source INCLUSIONS Inclusions and unique flavors set brands apart in this ever growing category. Sesame seed butter is traditionally known as tahini, a main ingredient in hummus, but it’s making its way more and more into the butter category. Ilka’s Chai Sesame Butter appeals to create a more memorable and unique experience when spread over toast or fruit. Big Spoon Roasters also offer various nut butter flavors, like Espresso and Vanilla...
Organic Snacking Reaches New Heights

Organic Snacking Reaches New Heights

Organic is a term synonymous with fresh, high quality foods that are free of harmful additives. Over the last twenty years, the consumer demand for organic foods has steadily increased, and thus the range of available options has grown exponentially. In fact, it’s one of the fastest growing segments of the food industry, with sales growing from $3.7 billion in 1997 to more than $43 billion in 2015, according to a recent report by the The Environmental Working Group. The fresh food spaces like dairy and produce have contributed quite a bit to this, because they are staples we can easily imagine making that “farm to table” transition. Yet, one of the most highly demanded organic categories right now is snacks. Lots of on-the-go snacking options are highly processed – the ingredients required to preserve, color and flavor them are often a far cry from natural, let alone organic. However, busy lifestyles with a health conscious mindset have set the desire for quick and healthy food options at an all time high.   Ahead of the Game The organic snacking movement gained a lot of its momentum in the form of small companies with big personalities, often breaking away from their conventional competitors with unique offerings.  There continues to be a huge space for these types of brands. Hippeas are satisfyingly crunchy and savory snack featuring an unconventional chief ingredient: chickpeas. Similarly, Barnana pushes boundaries with good-for-you indulgence in the form of “upcycled bananas”. Both are focused on sustainability and conscious eating. By consistently finding ways to bring unique options to the table, companies are keeping organic as fresh...
HPP Stirs Up the Baby Food Category

HPP Stirs Up the Baby Food Category

High pressure processing (HPP) is a method of preservation which extends the shelf life of fresh foods without affecting the natural flavors of ingredients or adding harmful preservatives. It’s an ideal way to receive the maximum amount of nutrients from fruits and vegetables without actually having to consume them fresh. It’s allowed for cold-pressed juices like Suja and Evolution to become widely available in stores everywhere. Naturally, parents want their children to consume the most quality foods with the best nutrients possible. Pre-packaged baby foods have traditionally been restricted to jarred, heat pasteurized options, but HPP is shifting the category. Though HPP products require refrigeration, parents (millennials in particular) are driving the demand for the nutrient rich, bacteria free baby foods that are afforded by this method. According the Huffington Post, “the future of baby food is in our chillers”.     For now, it’s a new and unexplored category, and a few brands are already leading the charge. Many parents have taken to cooking from scratch for little ones rather than offering something that they wouldn’t eat themselves – food that doesn’t look, smell or taste fresh. The founders of Pure Spoon are two such parents who recognize that providing naturally delicious foods at an early age can usher in a lifetime of healthy eating habits. While created with the intention to target babies not yet capable of eating solid foods, the cold pasteurized purees quickly proved to be a success with older children – particularly, picky eaters who could be coerced into eating vegetables if they were tastier and less recognizable.     Reinforcing the notion that eating...
4 Things Hormel Has Taught Us About Success

4 Things Hormel Has Taught Us About Success

Canned meat doesn’t have much room to shine in an organic, farm-to-table focused society. Yet, the company best known for manufacturing the iconic pink product have muscled their way onto the Fortune 500 list. And it’s taken a lot more than some preserved pork to spur the $9.3 billion in revenue they’ve seen this year. So what notes can we take from the makers of Spam? 1 – Look for new talent that will make your organization think and act differently. Hormel struck a disconnect with their target audience, spurring the team to hire an anthropologist. Most notably, she helped them to understand the powerful and emotional https://www.viagrasansordonnancefr.com/viagra-effet/ role that food plays in people’s lives. Thus, the main objective became to understand their consumer’s unarticulated needs by looking at the food in their pantries and observing their eating habits. This opened up a whole world of possibilities. 2 – Don’t focus on what the competition is doing. It’s easy to get caught up in trends. In 2012, Hormel, still widely recognized for its meat-based products, began researching and reaching out to companies who made products that would work well within their existing protein focus. It became important for them to procure an assortment of brands that sold organic and healthy foods, setting themselves apart from other traditional processed meat manufacturers. This journey took the company well outside the realm of animal products, even going as far to buy the makers of Wholly Guacamole in 2012.   3 – Always meet with potential partners in person to break bread and understand who they are. CEO Jeff Ettinger ensured that Hormel stood...
Trend Watch: Native Foods

Trend Watch: Native Foods

At Interact, we pride ourselves on having a unique perspective of the multi-faceted food world. As a result, we can often spot trends before they’re widespread. We’re very familiar with the local food movement that has gained some serious traction in recent years, even trouncing organic in the eyes of consumers. Opting for products that were grown closer to home means fresher food and supporting local business. A fascinating sect of this movement that we’ve seen on the rise recently is native, or indigenous food. In this somewhat old world way of eating, the ingredients for meals are not only produced locally, but are made up entirely of the indigenous fauna and flora from the region in which it is served. This makes a whole new world of foods available to us that we may have never heard of, but that grew in our backyards all along. It’s the ultimate culinary adventure; a tour of your home unlike any other.     At the forefront of this movement is the renowned Danish restaurant, Noma. Rated the best restaurant in the world four times by Restaurant magazine, the food is rooted in simplicity, freshness and quality. All ingredients on the menu are indigenous foods native to the region, creating a revolutionary spin on Nordic cuisine. The Native Food Movement gives culture a starring role in the eating experience. Sean Sherman, aka the Sioux Chef, is dedicated to reinventing the foods of his ancestors. He’s mastered inventive recipes, while restricting the ingredients used to those that would have been available to the Sioux tribe years ago. Damon Baehrel established one of the highest demand restaurant experiences ever, with reservations booked as far out as the year 2025. The scene...