The Decline of Packaging

The Decline of Packaging

For residents here in Boulder, recycling is second nature. It’s a commonly known fact that our wasted materials have a detrimental effect on the environment. Plastic in particular is a major contributor to the levels of pollution in our oceans and land alike. When nearly every piece of plastic that’s ever been made still exists in some shape or form, and so much of what we consume comes in packaging that is thrown out immediately, we’re acutely aware of this problem. We do our best to recycle and repurpose these materials, yet a question remains – what if a purpose for that waste was never created? That’s the thinking behind the Anti-Packaging Movement, which eschews disposable packaging entirely. There have been lots of idealized concepts of water and food packaged in edible containers cropping up lately. This ingenuity supports the notion of precycling, but brings about the inevitable issue of hygiene. Not many folks are willing to pop something in their mouth that has been exposed to who-knows-what on the journey from manufacturer to store. Before modern packaging was integrated into our society, the exchange of goods was much more casual. Shoppers would hand select supplies straight from merchants, and transport them home in reusable containers. How can we bring bridge the disconnect between those the old-world market traditions and the higher standards of sanitization in this day and age? Zero-waste markets are a start. Though a great deal of grocery stores feature bulk dried foods and produce sections, they typically require the use of plastic bags as storage to transport home. A recent New York Times article highlighted the German store Original...
Interact Drops Some Knowledge at BevNet’s 2015 Winter Conference

Interact Drops Some Knowledge at BevNet’s 2015 Winter Conference

On December 6th our Creative Director Fred Hart was given the opportunity to speak at BevNet in Santa Monica to a room full of hungry (and thirsty) beverage entrepreneurs.  His topic, The Six Principles of Branding and Packaging, focused on helping entrepreneurs understand the fundamental truths that drive powerful brands and packaging design. Each of the Principles below encapsulates a great idea that Fred expands upon in his talk. 1) Know Yourself 2) Your Brand > Your Product 3) The Power of a Promise 4) Challenge the Category 5) People Don’t Read 6) The Power of Social Currency Check out the video below for the full talk!  ...
Press // BevNet

Press // BevNet

In the September edition of BevNet Magazine, our President, Blake Mitchell was quoted on the topic of high pressure processed (HPP) cold pressed juices.  The article highlights the evolution of label and package design in this particular beverage sphere, and the direction this movement could go as it gains momentum. Check out the article below: Hey, is it just us or are all these cold-pressed juice brands starting to look the same?   Look, we get it, these guys are spending a lot of their money on produce, and custom mold bottles don’t come cheap. Thanks to the cold pasteurization technology known as high pressure processing (HPP) – which has extended these juices’ shelf life to up to 45 days – the cold-pressed category has left the juice bar. So much so that in August, The Coca-Cola Company made a $90 million investment in San Diego-based Suja Juice.   This probably goes without saying, but a brick and mortar juice brand and a Coke-backed one operate under entirely different sets of rules. So as the business of HPP juice continues to expand into more conventional retailers, the importance of packaging choices has increase, with brands competing for consumer eyeballs alongside one another in the cold case.   Because of the intense pressure in the processing machines, the HPP process does have some restrictions, most prominently no glass. But the homogenous look that’s been seen across the segment might have more to do with the startup nature of these brands and they’ve elected to allocate their resources outside of expensive custom mold bottles, rather than any significant technical structural limitations, experts say.  ...
Food: The Medium of Millennials

Food: The Medium of Millennials

  Eve Turow’s book A Taste of Generation YUM focuses on how the Millennial Generation’s obsession with food has the potential to largely impact the future of food. Eve spent three and a half years interviewing peers and celebrity chefs to gather insight about why Millennials are food obsessed and what large-scale changes may arise from this obsession. Packaged food brands should pay attention to this rising obsession and it’s effect on long term trends in consumer interest and purchasing. Her research suggests that Millennials find assurance and comfort in food’s tangibility because it allows them to exert control over a sector of their lives. She says, “There are so many things that food offers that we don’t receive in our day-to-day anymore. Food offers sensory stimulation and community. There’s something so fundamental about eating, that in a world of clicks, buzzes and dings, the simplicity and tangibility of it significantly resonates with us as a generation.” She goes deeper by saying, “What you eat is a decision you have – control you can exert – three times a day.” Food has become the medium for Millenials to maintain personal space in a technologically driven environment where they may feel their decisions are entirely reactionary to constant information and updates. Food allows this generation to experience and engage in fundamental human intrinsic needs. Turow describes food as “the anti-technology.” Our generation is driven and linked by technology, which can’t offer us the full stimulation or community that we need. What are the implications to this obsession with food? Food policy is gaining more traction as “foodies” gain more attention. As...

Featured // Greenest Companies in Boulder

Interact is always working to bring innovative and strategic design to grocery shelves and whenever possible, integrate eco-friendly practices into our packaging. Clean Conscience recently recognized our internal and external efforts to reduce our carbon footprint, rating Interact in the top 20 of Greenest Companies in Boulder. Whenever possible, we try to recommend sustainable packaging and plant-based inks to our clients. We also opt for fresh air rather than AC, community water jugs rather than bottled drinks, and obviously, recycle everything. See what the Clean Conscience had to say here:   Interact is a branding and packaging design firm that works directly with Consumer Packaged Goods companies (CPGs). Our unique industry and skill set allows us to consult with our clients and partners on best practices to eliminate unnecessary packaging waste, sparing businesses of excessive environmental impact while also helping to save money and materials. When appropriate, we also recommend the use of recycled paper substrates and plant based inks to enhance our unique and compelling design solutions. These business practices are paired with the companies own Eco-friendly measures: everyday office recycling, water jug use to cut down on consumption of bottled beverages, use of open windows and fresh air over AC whenever possible, and the use of our abundant natural light over electricity. See full article here....
Is Consistency the Key? Or is it the Crop?

Is Consistency the Key? Or is it the Crop?

Consistency is key, they say. This is a standard taught to us from childhood across a variety of subject matters that is particularly relevant when it comes to food. From restaurants to grocery provisions, the public demands a high level of similarity when it comes to what they eat and discrepancy in flavor is not well received by the hangry. Consumers have come to expect that if they order a dish or purchase a product it should be the exact same time and again regardless of other extraneous influences. However, recent changes in consumer trends demand that both the restaurant and retail experience are more of just that, an experience. People crave this artisanal, curated food experience chock-full of locally-sourced, organic, seasonal, non-gmo, and unique ingredients. So how are food providers adhering to consistency expectations and new consumer trends? A new theory suggests they’re not. Consumers can’t have their gluten-free, vegan, all-natural, non-gmo, cake and eat it too. If curated ingredients, untouched by human modification, is what the people want then inconsistency is the new standard they should expect. Eric J. Pierce of New Hope Media recently explained the idea of expecting inconsistency in his article, “Changing Our Expectations of Ketchup (and everything else processed)” saying, “When we buy something that is hand-crafted, we appreciate “unique,” not “ubiquity.” What he means here is that recent consumer trends are great; they divulge from processed and mass-manufactured goods that have previously dominated grocery store shelves. However, these changes in food production are based on the availability and variation naturally found in produce and meats which then bleeds into the finished-food-product. Pierce...