The Growth of Nut and Seed Butters

The Growth of Nut and Seed Butters

Peanut butter is a classic protein packed snack that’s versatile enough to be combined with just about anything. For a long time, it was the only kind of nut butter that people knew of. With constantly evolving consumer dietary needs, we’ve seen a boom in “butters” made from all kinds of different nuts and seeds. Here are a few aspects of this growing category that brands are taking into account: Source PRESENTATION The demand for peanut butter alternatives has resulted in an influx of “butters” made from ground almonds, cashews, pistachios and more. Often at a higher price point, it is common to see companies touting the healthy benefits of their product. Nutraw’s pistachio butter features packaging that is more elevated than what you might associate with a typical peanut butter jar, reflecting the minimal ingredients (stripped down to just pistachios, coconut oil and vanilla). Similarly, butters are increasingly being made from seeds – even ones you may not have ever thought to eat. Sunflower and pumpkin seed butters have been heralded as friendly options for consumers with nut allergies. Watermelon seed butter is unconventional yet intriguing. Sakara’s version appeals to consumers based on its aesthetic alone. The cream colored product is complemented by equally clean packaging, suggesting its simplicity and quality. Source INCLUSIONS Inclusions and unique flavors set brands apart in this ever growing category. Sesame seed butter is traditionally known as tahini, a main ingredient in hummus, but it’s making its way more and more into the butter category. Ilka’s Chai Sesame Butter appeals to create a more memorable and unique experience when spread over toast or fruit. Big Spoon Roasters also offer various nut butter flavors, like Espresso and Vanilla...
Addressing Bigger and Bolder Nutritional Facts

Addressing Bigger and Bolder Nutritional Facts

After 20 years, the FDA announced that they are updating the 1993 nutrition label by 2017 to today’s standards and priorities. The Obama administration estimates the changes will cost the industry $2 billion but will lead to $30 billion in benefits. (Advertising Age ) This is the first major change to the nutrition label since trans fat was added to the label in 2006. The major label changes include the calorie count being bigger and bolder, adjusted serving sizes, and the differentiation between added sugar and natural sugar. These changes will greatly affect packaging and marketing strategies. We anticipate that these new changes will provoke marketers to answer to the greater health consciousness among consumers. The increased emphasis on calories is the most dramatic change to the label requirements, and it will immediately discourage high-calorie products, even if the producers can emphasize other qualities. While more prominent calorie information may discourage the purchase of some products, it can serve to promote other products that endorse themselves as a healthier alternative for consumers who are increasingly mindful of their calorie and sugar consumption. More favorable nutritional information may encourage consumers to sever ties with familiar and loyal brands. Stressing the calorie count miss represents products that have a high amount of healthy fat. We can see that the yogurt category will be greatly affected by this change because the new age consumers have formed a craze around high fat yogurt. People now understand, “The belief that fat isn’t a health villain has been gaining traction the last few years, especially as data has piled up showing that low-fat diets don’t...