The Vegan Society Debuts Vegan Trademark

The Vegan Society Debuts Vegan Trademark

The Vegan Society, based in the United Kingdom, recently launched their new trademark that certifies vegan standard for food products. Several food companies are already sporting the new certification on package. Will this go the way of the gluten free and non-GMO certifications that have graced packaging for the last few years? It certainly instills a sense of wellbeing and assurance for the consumer, as the certification requires that specific standards be met by the companies before they will stand behind them. As we see it moving across the UK and Europe, we wonder how it’s going to affect the US. Vegan products are already doing well right now, particularly in the snacking category, but the Certified Vegan mark is not necessarily a deciding factor for the average consumer at this...
Transitional Farms Spur Organic Farm Growth

Transitional Farms Spur Organic Farm Growth

The availability of organic foods continues to increase exponentially. Yet, despite double-digit growth in consumer demand for organic foods every year since the 1990s, organic acreage has not kept up, according to the U.S.D.A. In fact, less than 1% of U.S. farmland is certified organic. (Food Business News) So, how can the supply begin to meet the demand? It all comes back to needing more organic farms. This proves to be more complicated than one might think, as a farm must undergo a process that requires meeting USDA Organic standards for three years before qualifying to convert from conventional to organic. This causes a lot of economic uncertainty for farmers, but some companies are taking steps to incentivise them.   Kashi’s “Certified Transitional” program guarantees that certain products will utilize grains for transitional farms, in hopes to convert more farms to organic throughout the country. The Dark Cocoa Karma Cereal utilizes wheat from transitional farms exclusively, and Kashi continues to integrate more transitional ingredients into more products. The packaging design doesn’t differ much from other products from the brand, but the mark for “Certified Transitional” is proudly displayed along with “Non-GMO” and “Fair Trade” certifications. In 2015, Clif Bar made an agreement with one of its growers to transition their farm from conventional to organic, offsetting the cost by agreeing to purchase the crops for seven years after receiving organic certification. The company also bought the farm’s “transition period” crops. Bigger companies like White Wave Foods and Costco are reported to be following suit by utilizing transitional ingredients, so we are likely to see more foods labeled as “Certified...