Nitro Coldbrew Brings the Coffeehouse Experience Home

Nitro Coldbrew Brings the Coffeehouse Experience Home

Nitrogen carbonated beers have carved a niche for beer aficionados, and now it’s overflowing into the coffee world as well. Made popular by Stumptown Coffee of Portland, this innovative new way to drink java has instilled a bar-like quality into cafes across the nation. The drink is served on draft, making for a creamier and richer alternative to traditionally strong and often bitter cold brew. While its been generally reserved as an in-store experience, nitro coffee is expanding to the ready-to-drink beverage category. The price point for nitro coffee on-the-go is expected to be higher than your typical single-serve coffees, as the product typically calls for widget-equipped packaging – the same as we see used in canned Guinness beers. This doesn’t seem to deter consumers, because there are a rising amount of companies starting to offer nitro cold brews that aren’t only available on draft.     As leaders in the movement, Stumptown offers a canned nitro cold brew that is available in select cafes and stores. The nitro variety stands apart as the only canned product (all others are contained in cartons or bottles). The word “Nitro” is a strong callout typeset against a white background on top of the can, with the logo and additional information taking secondary hierarchy. It’s a classic and simple design that definitely stands apart from other ready to drink coffees in store refrigerator shelves.     La Colombe is another coffee company trying its hand at retail nitro coffee. Sold in a four pack, the design of the “Draft Latte” is elegant and minimalistic. On package, no mention is made of the carbonation method. Instead, the brand chooses...
Brand on a Mission: The Soulfull Project

Brand on a Mission: The Soulfull Project

Choosing a “buy one, give one to someone in need” product is something that everyone can feel good about. An abundance of companies that base their ethos on this model are thriving. One notable example is Tom’s shoes, but it’s a movement that we’re seeing expand to other life necessities such as eyeglasses, water filtration systems, and food. The simple act of buying has become one of the easiest ways to pay it forward. Four employees from Campbell’s soup felt the need to make a positive change in their community, and the Soulfull Project was born. They were inspired by the working class families they encountered, who struggled to afford wholesome foods. With the intent to help people start their days strongly (no matter what walk of life they came from) the Soulfull Project introduced a line of instant hot cereals. For every serving bought, another would be donated to a food bank. Backed by the power of a food industry giant, while focusing on impacting the lives of individuals makes this a uniquely operated business. The production of product helped by an established infrastructure leaves lots of room for little pockets of personalization, like including handwritten notes in the packages. While the company is looking to expand its offerings, it’s this type of purpose ingrained in the brand that allows for a truly human connection to shine through – even for a large scale company.   It’s brands like these that get us into the spirit of giving and gratitude. Wishing you a happy Thanksgiving from...
Drinking Vinegars On the Rise

Drinking Vinegars On the Rise

Kombuchas are moving over on shelf to make room for a drink that is fresh to the category, but is steeped in tradition: drinking vinegars. As discussed in our trend prediction post earlier this year, consumers are shifting trust to the tried and true methods proven effective through history and culture. With a renewed focus on good gut health, foods high in probiotics are gaining popularity, and so this uncommon beverage is now being offered by small and established companies alike. Here are a couple that we’ve got our eye on right now.   Pok Pok Som This brand was born in a Portland restaurant called Pok Pok, where the drinks are made in-house using fruit, vinegar, sugar, salt and water. Pok Pok Som is now available for order outside of the restaurant, signifying that the demand for this fermented elixir is growing.   Suja Suja is a well established fresh beverage brand, most recognized for their cold-pressed juice offerings. With a heavy positioning on health, rejuvenation and cleansing, drinking vinegar is an addition that integrates well into the lineup of products that this company offers.   Pressery Pressery is another brand that carries a variety of health forward beverages, including cold pressed juices and broths. While the thought of sipping vinegar is less than appealing to some, Pressery has taken an innovative spin by using coconut vinegar. This uncommon ingredient combined with different fruit juices and maple syrup makes for an intriguing product that will catch eyes on...
Meeting the Team 03: Abby

Meeting the Team 03: Abby

If the office were burning down Abby would be the only one walking calmly out of the building. Everyone agrees that she is the most grounded and kindhearted person. Abby is the studio manager here at Interact. She has been working with us for just over 6 months. Although she is not the oldest member of the team, she is someone that everyone counts on in their day-to-day lives. Abby is a restaurant expert and could rival any yelp or Google review. If you ever need a good recommendation for any activity or food in Boulder, Abby is your girl. We are very lucky to have here at Interact! She is a quintessential aspect to producing the good work that leaves this office everyday. 1. Tell us a little about yourself. I am a Colorado Native and have lived up and down the Front Range, but consider Boulder my home.  I am the Studio Manager at Interact, which is sometimes known as a Project Manager per agency lingo. I direct traffic between the account team and design along with many other admin duties. 2. Why did you want to work in advertising/ packaging design? when did you know it was what you wanted to do? I have always been interested in the creative world. I always held a strong interest in fashion, interior design, and branding/advertising. I have been able to dip my toes into many of those industries and have found with age and experience that I prefer design over traditional advertising. I enjoy being a part of that process and seeing things curated from the ground up;...
HPP Stirs Up the Baby Food Category

HPP Stirs Up the Baby Food Category

High pressure processing (HPP) is a method of preservation which extends the shelf life of fresh foods without affecting the natural flavors of ingredients or adding harmful preservatives. It’s an ideal way to receive the maximum amount of nutrients from fruits and vegetables without actually having to consume them fresh. It’s allowed for cold-pressed juices like Suja and Evolution to become widely available in stores everywhere. Naturally, parents want their children to consume the most quality foods with the best nutrients possible. Pre-packaged baby foods have traditionally been restricted to jarred, heat pasteurized options, but HPP is shifting the category. Though HPP products require refrigeration, parents (millennials in particular) are driving the demand for the nutrient rich, bacteria free baby foods that are afforded by this method. According the Huffington Post, “the future of baby food is in our chillers”.     For now, it’s a new and unexplored category, and a few brands are already leading the charge. Many parents have taken to cooking from scratch for little ones rather than offering something that they wouldn’t eat themselves – food that doesn’t look, smell or taste fresh. The founders of Pure Spoon are two such parents who recognize that providing naturally delicious foods at an early age can usher in a lifetime of healthy eating habits. While created with the intention to target babies not yet capable of eating solid foods, the cold pasteurized purees quickly proved to be a success with older children – particularly, picky eaters who could be coerced into eating vegetables if they were tastier and less recognizable.     Reinforcing the notion that eating...