4 Ways to Captivate Health Minded Consumers

4 Ways to Captivate Health Minded Consumers

NEWS FLASH: New Report Confirms Consumers across all demographics are interested in healthier foods. We are seeing a shift in the mind of the consumer who is on the hunt for healthier options in the marketplace. Natural food brands should be aware of this shift as they continue to grow into conventional grocery where conventional shoppers are on the hunt for cleaner ingredient profiles that provide a function beyond a tasty snack. Keep in mind that “health” takes on different meaning in Boulder, CO than it does in Omaha, NE, but as you gear your brand to drive trial and create a bond with this new open minded conventional consumer, here are a few ways to attract them: 01. APPROACHABILITY If you’re selling an unknown ingredient in a known form (Example, Quinoa Chip), make it easy through messaging and copy for consumers know what you’re bringing to the table. Consumers should quickly understand that you’re offering a great tasting chip that everyone knows and loves with great health benefits, etc. It would be helpful to think about addressing taste, texture and possibly the ingredient story along with any other questions an uneducated consumer may have. We all know what chips are so think to yourself: How can you break it down and make the unknown a known? 02. DESIGN Consumers today are showing up to shelf with a distrust for big brands that have typically used saturated colors, big fonts, etc. However, the natural + organic space is no longer just utilizing earthy tones — there is movement toward these brighter colors that once indicated less healthy options. 03....
Featured Friends // 5 Key Teams Every New Startup Needs

Featured Friends // 5 Key Teams Every New Startup Needs

With so many friends in the industry, Interact wanted to pass the microphone off to a few of our favorite food industry professionals.  Food Force is a boutique food industry recruiting and staffing agency, specializing in hiring strategy and organizational design.  They firmly believe in partnerships, and hand-crafted, long term partnerships.  They are experts in the food biz, and have insight into what every new startup requires to get off of the ground.  Lauren Weiss is an NYC Copywriter for Food Force, and here’s what he had to say: So you’ve got the next great idea for a startup. You have the vision, you have the passion, and with the help of Interact you’ve got a beautiful brand and package design. Now what? Building a business solo is out of the question, so you’re going to need a killer staff to help you get the job done. At Force Brands, we spend our time recruiting the best in the food and beverage biz to help young brands grow into the brands everyone knows and loves. We’ve boiled it down to five key teams that’ll have you up and running in no time: Sales You’re not making this product for yourself, after all; you want to sell your product to the masses, so you need to build a team of people dedicating entirely to making that a reality. These are the people working with retailers, wholesalers, and distributors to make sure the product is making its way to shelves and households wherever you want to be. Depending on how expansive you want your reach to be, from the bottom up you’ll need sales...
Press // BevNet

Press // BevNet

In the September edition of BevNet Magazine, our President, Blake Mitchell was quoted on the topic of high pressure processed (HPP) cold pressed juices.  The article highlights the evolution of label and package design in this particular beverage sphere, and the direction this movement could go as it gains momentum. Check out the article below: Hey, is it just us or are all these cold-pressed juice brands starting to look the same?   Look, we get it, these guys are spending a lot of their money on produce, and custom mold bottles don’t come cheap. Thanks to the cold pasteurization technology known as high pressure processing (HPP) – which has extended these juices’ shelf life to up to 45 days – the cold-pressed category has left the juice bar. So much so that in August, The Coca-Cola Company made a $90 million investment in San Diego-based Suja Juice.   This probably goes without saying, but a brick and mortar juice brand and a Coke-backed one operate under entirely different sets of rules. So as the business of HPP juice continues to expand into more conventional retailers, the importance of packaging choices has increase, with brands competing for consumer eyeballs alongside one another in the cold case.   Because of the intense pressure in the processing machines, the HPP process does have some restrictions, most prominently no glass. But the homogenous look that’s been seen across the segment might have more to do with the startup nature of these brands and they’ve elected to allocate their resources outside of expensive custom mold bottles, rather than any significant technical structural limitations, experts say.  ...