Local’s The New Organic

Local’s The New Organic

Yup, that’s right. One of 2015 food trends is the local food movement in which consumers are becoming more educated and more concerned with the process and sourcing and ingredients that go into their foods, and rightfully so; responsible food sourcing is a trend that’s here to stay. Organic was one of the first trends to disrupt the mass-manufactured food scene but the more educated consumers become, the more they want even better foods and that means local. Often times, the two go hand in hand but that isn’t always the case, and recent reports suggest that locally sourced foods are becoming more important in the consumer mindset than organic. David Sprinkle, a Packaged Facts research director says that “We’ve reached a tipping point for local foods,” meaning that the focus on local food could easily surpass the sales of “organic” food. However, “consumers take the term ‘local’ and they infer that it’s from a small farm, they infer it’s organic, even though it may not be,” says Shermain Hardesty, PhD, extension economist at UC Davis’ agricultural and resource economics program. In short, many questions are being raised about the integrity of the term “local.” Some consumers feel that this label is often used as marketing hype, yet “the Packaged Facts report notes, nearly half of people surveyed said that they are willing to pay up to 10% more for locally grown or produced foods, and almost one in three said they are willing to pay up to 25% more.” There isn’t a definitive ‘agreed upon’ definition of “locally-grown,” as there isn’t a consensus on the distance from farm...
Featured Friends // Reductive Capture

Featured Friends // Reductive Capture

This summer were letting some of our friends in the field take over the blog to provide some expert advice on all things concerning the grocery space. This week, Brent Taylor explains his own term, Reductive Capture, as a means of organizing a successful food photography shoot. Here’s what he had to say: I work as a commercial still life photographer, with a focus on proprietary images of food, liquids, and products. 80% of my work is in the packaging and advertising world of food and beverage photography. After my work is produced, it typically makes its way to a food or beverage package on your local supermarket shelves, or a point of sale display near the checkout counter. “Reductive Capture” is a phrase I came up with about five years ago. It is my attempt to define a concept that has proved to be very useful to me. It is also a way for me to establish a workflow on set that everyone in my crew understands. This is probably not a new concept; many professional photographers do this without thinking about it. During a photo-shoot we have several key players in place to make sure thing are going smoothly. Most of the time we have some folks from the creative agency on set to guide and direct us creatively to achieve their vision. We also typically have a few folks from the client side on set to make sure their product is being represented correctly, and in its best light. (Pardon the Pun) When an image is completed on set, everyone in the studio, photographer, stylist, creative agency,...
Sound Tea Makes Waves at 2015 Fancy Food Show

Sound Tea Makes Waves at 2015 Fancy Food Show

Alas, the 2015 Summer Fancy Food show has come to a close and the reviews are in. While the expo included a lot of unique and up and coming grocery brands, it was Sound Sparkling Tea that made serious waves at this year’s show. U.S. News’s Tamara Duker Freuman released her favorites in “Best Bites from the 2015 Fancy Food Show”, recognizing Sound as one of the best unsweetened beverages at the show. Here’s what she had to say: Sound Sparkling Tea: While I personally find unsweetened teas to be refreshing and palatable enough, I’ll concede they can sometimes leave me wanting more flavor. So I was pleasantly surprised upon sampling the three effervescent bottled teas from Sound, whose bold flavors were enhanced by their fizziness and rose above the subtle “essences” that most unsweetened teas deliver. The Alive flavor is the most caffeinated of the bunch – based as it is on Yerba mate – and has a citrusy profile from hibiscus and lemon. The Refresh flavor is white tea-based and moderately caffeinated, with peachy ginger notes. And the uncaffeinated chamomile-based Calm variety conjures up a vanilla cream soda – without the cloying sweetness. All three flavors have zero calories and no sugar.   Congrats to Sound Sparkling Tea  on being recognized, yet again, for being at the forefront of beverage innovation. Interact has enjoyed the opportunity to work with Sound and we can’t wait to see what cool stuff the Sound team keeps making happen.   See the full article...