20 Emerging Boulder Food Brands

20 Emerging Boulder Food Brands

Recently named the Start-Up Capitol, Boulder seems to be the mecca for up and coming brands, especially within food and beverage. With new brands popping up everywhere, it’s hard to find the good ones but not to worry, we are here to help . Here’s our list of promising local...
Featured Friends // Choose Your Words Carefully

Featured Friends // Choose Your Words Carefully

With so many friends in the industry, Interact wanted to pass the mic. off to a few of our favorite food packaging professionals.  Although we are more design-minded we have a few friends that will be taking over the Interact blog to provide a little more knowledge about the ever-changing food and beverage industry. With over 11 years experience as a lawyer specializing in food & beverage, dietary supplement, and cosmetic industries, Justin J. Prochnow was able to provide us with a few cliff notes concerning little-known knowledge about controversial PDP claims. Here’s what he had to say:   Language is an important element of the law and, for that matter, being a lawyer.  Have you ever met a lawyer that didn’t like to wax poetic about anything and everything?  In my practice representing companies in the food, beverage, dietary supplement and cosmetic industries, “wordsmithing” has never been more critical. The importance of carefully selecting the right words to promote products in labeling and advertising is at an all time high. While companies are competing to sell products and be persuasive in the message, companies must also use caution when composing their labeling and advertising messages. The use of certain words and phrases, especially on food packaging and labeling, can result in a company making certain claims that it does not realize it is making and did not intend to make, putting it at risk from regulatory agencies like the Food and Drug Administration (“FDA”) and the Federal Trade Commission (“FTC”), as well as plaintiff lawyers looking to ride the wave of class action lawsuits over labeling and advertising claims. Never has it...
Why the Snapple ReDesign?

Why the Snapple ReDesign?

As the ready-to-drink tea category continues to grow, larger companies are attempting to squeeze into the market by reinventing and extending their current brands; both Coca-Cola and PepsiCo. have come out with new products to compete within the category. The rise in competition and consumer demand has also pushed existing RTD tea brands, like Snapple, to make drastic changes in the hopes of remaining a category leader. Snapple recently debuted their new packaging, by CBX, but new doesn’t always mean better. While past Snapple designs have been minimal and straightforward, making the product easy to identify and understand, the re-design features a multitude of different elements that further clutter the small amount of real estate on the label. Maybe we’re just die-hards for the previous label, or maybe the redesign just doesn’t work. Either way, here’s three new things that would have been better left untouched: 1. Logo: In addition to placing the logo at an angle, an illustrated sun has been added to lock-up the “All Natural” call-out. It’s possible that the logic behind this design decision was that it added personality and redefined the idea of the sun in conjunction with tea but we’re still not sold on the execution. The old logo manages to convey the idea of the sun through a series of rays located behind the original, straight-forward logo, which, in this case, is the more effective design element of the two.     2. Call-Outs: The old PDP utilized a single call-out to convey a specific product attribute. The redesign added an additional call-out that includes their tagline, “The BEST stuff in the...
Big Food Is Going Down

Big Food Is Going Down

It’s really no secret that consumer demand over the last few years has been focused on healthier, more sustainable food trends but I doubt large food manufacturer’s predicted a $4 billion loss in market share. Over the years, consumers have opted for smaller food brands that truly care about the production and quality of their ingredients and big food manufacturer’s are certainly feeling the heat. Fortune’s Beth Kowitt recently reported on the shift in consumer habits and here’s what she had to say: SPECIAL REPORT: THE WAR ON BIG FOOD   Major packaged-food companies lost $4 billion in market share alone last year, as shoppers swerved to fresh and organic alternatives. Can the supermarket giants win you back?   Try this simple test. Say the following out loud: Artificial colors and flavors. Pesticides. Preservatives. High-fructose corn syrup. Growth hormones. Antibiotics. Gluten. Genetically modified organisms. If any one of these terms raised a hair on the back of your neck, left a sour taste in your mouth, or made your lips purse with disdain, you are part of Big Food’s multibillion-dollar problem. In fact, you may even belong to a growing consumer class that has some of the world’s biggest and best-known companies scrambling to change their businesses. Lest you think this is hyperbole, consider the commentary in February at the Consumer Analyst Group of New York conference, the packaged-goods industry’s premier annual gathering. “We look at our business and say, ‘How can we remake ourselves?’ ” said Richard Smucker, CEO of his family’s namesake jelly giant SJM 0.11% . A second exec—this one at ConAgra CAG -1.83% , which owns...