The Work Behind Wine Label Design

The Work Behind Wine Label Design

The Wall Street Journal’s Lettie Teague recently covered the effort that goes into making wine labels. The most effective labels are as much about strategy as aesthetics.  Get the full scope below: WHAT GOES INTO WINE LABEL DESIGN?   Ask someone the kind of wine he prefers and he may or may not be able to describe it; ask someone what kind of wine label he (or she) likes and you’re guaranteed to get a reply. From occasional imbibers to serious oenophiles, just about every wine drinker I know cares about labels—and even employs them as a buying guide. For example, my friend Robert likes labels with silver type but won’t buy a bottle if there are “snakes, frogs or shoes” as part of the design, no matter how good the wine inside may be.   A wine label with wide appeal is a winery’s single greatest sales tool. It can make a good wine more desirable and a bad wine more salable. It is the sole emissary on the store shelf and perhaps, as Corey Miller hopes, a source of great wealth.   Dr. Miller, a San Francisco-based M.D.-Ph.D. turned wine entrepreneur, just launched a label-centric wine company, Bare Bottle, that matches top American design talent with first-rate winemakers from the West Coast. He has partnered with graphic designers, engineers and tech entrepreneurs to form a company whose offerings will be marketed largely through the designers’ social-media accounts. “We think there is a lot of power in these artists and designers,” said Dr. Miller. “They have tens of thousands of Twitter and Instagram followers.” By comparison, he added, most winemakers have...
What Does Farm-to-Table Really Mean?

What Does Farm-to-Table Really Mean?

We thought maybe it was just the Boulder bubble, but apparently the over-use of farm-to-table has caused more confusion than clarification. Because so many restaurants and food brands are using the phrase, it doesn’t have much meaning any more. A recent article in Vanity Fair by Corby Kummer covered the almost cliche phrase; take a look: I used to dream of being able to go to a restaurant near where I live that would serve the freshest and most local vegetables nearly naked, so that diners could taste them in their just-picked glory rather than lost in cloakings of purslane pesto and thick almondromesco sauce. Where simply grilled pieces of meat and fish would arrive glistening with the lightest painting of olive oil. Where chefs would seek out local cheese-makers and farmers who cared about the pigs and cattle and chickens they raised, like the food producers and farmers I’ve made it a practice to seek out, buy from, and write about in an attempt to keep them in business. Why couldn’t the restaurants I went to and reviewed save me the trouble of finding everybody for myself? Why did I have to root everyone out, argue with my editors over whether “artisanal” was a word, and wait till I was headed across the Bay Bridge to Chez Panisse to know I could trust the provenance of what was set in front of me?   I forgot to be careful what I wished for. Today, chefs can’t shut up about where every morsel that went into every dish got its start in life. “Locavore” isn’t enough: new words are necessary....
Featured // Sound Tea Reviewed by BevNET

Featured // Sound Tea Reviewed by BevNET

Sound Tea was recently reviewed by popular beverage-focused magazine, BevNET. The sparkling tea has made waves in the otherwise sleepy ready-to-drink tea category by combining the bubbles of soda with the refreshing characteristics of unsweetened tea. Two of the three flavors, Alive, Refresh, and Calm, were put under the microscope and easily passed the test. See what BevNet had to say about Calm and Refresh’s flavor profiles below: Calm: The Chamomile flavor of Sound Sparkling Tea is our favorite of the three varieties that we sampled. This unsweetened product has zero calories, but is not short on flavor. The base of herbal tea, which includes chamomile, elderflower, yarrow, and lavender, pairs very well with the touch of vanilla that the company has added. It’s almost like a play on a cream soda, both in the color of the liquid and the flavor of it. Either way, it works quite well without the addition of any sweetener. And, unlike Sound’s other flavors that have a slightly acidic note to their finish, this one is quite clean. While we’ve had other sparkling tea beverages in the past, the flavor of this product is superior and we like the fact that it’s unsweetened. All in all, this is a very enjoyable product. On the packaging end of things, the company has done a nice job of making this stock bottle look very attractive. The branding and label design are a big step up from their prior product line (“Sodterra”). It has a modern and sophisticated vibe to it, while also feeling approachable. However, we still feel as though there should be a larger callout for the product’s unsweetened...
Packaging Haul 06

Packaging Haul 06

We’ve finally had a little bit of room to breathe, with some of our projects wrapping up and others are kicking off. Take a look at what we had the chance to find this week: 1. Oppo “Oppo is a new ultra-premium ice cream that has a healthy indulgence proposition and they took the next in conceptual level by showing a hippo blending into a hummingbird with a tagline “Eat like a hippo, feel like a hummingbird” – Blake 2. All Good Sauce “All Good Sauce is packaged in a cute little, almost apothecary size bottle which makes it feel precious. While the playful typography within the brand badge speaks to personality and almost conveys a voice of its own. “ – Mollie 3. Pantone Beer Cans (Conceptual) “Spanish Agency, Txaber, have reimagined beer packaging with their series of pantone-inspired brews labelled according to the exact colours of the delicious liquids inside the can. Great for design geeks and perfect for ale drinkers who have a darker, lighter or bang in the middle ale preference.  Another great way for a brand to interact with its consumers from an experience standpoint.” – Kyla 4. Neato Burrito (Conceptual) “I love the conceptual design of Neato Burrito. It’s not just the desing I love, but the practicality. The design affords burrito-lovers a like to enjoy, eat, and save for later without the hassle of floppy foil.”...