Absence of Negatives, Presence of Positives Theorem

Absence of Negatives, Presence of Positives Theorem

While perusing the grocery aisle – one of my favorite past times – I’ve noticed a trend that’s been emerging in the marketplace over the last several years. Growing up in the 80s and 90s (and yes, still growing up into the 00s), the abundance of brands screaming diet and weight loss claims at shoppers was overwhelming. Up until the more recent past, brands were making health claims by calling out what negative ingredients were not  included on the ingredient panel  or were included in limited amounts; an absence of negatives, if you will. Fat-free, low-sodium and low-calorie statements were prominently featured on front of pack, and when you were looking to make healthier food choices, you grabbed the bag, box or bottle that toted these claims. There has been a healthful shift in the consumer mindset,  causing people to pay closer attention to what they are putting in their bodies. While there are certainly small, more niche brands focusing solely on a more natural and organic approach, big brands are just  starting to get smart,  positioning their brands as  being more health forward and catering to the health conscious consumer.  These smaller brands have created an influx of competition, causing the big food brands to take a  new approach to health, hoping to  combat category-wide stagnant and even declining sales. Rather than focusing on the negatives, they’re focusing more on the positive – the presence of positives, to be exact. I distinctly remember my mother saying something in these regards to me as a child, so it makes you wonder why it has taken these big food brands so long to catch on to such a simple idea. Now when you reach for most products...
3 Food Companies That Effectively Target Millenials

3 Food Companies That Effectively Target Millenials

Millennials are all the buzz these days, and they’re setting trends that ripple across the globe. As consumers, they are looking beyond the product, and spending their dollars on brands whose values align with their own. Three food companies in particular have found a way to connect and engage with this demographic, and in doing so have retained a large Millennial consumer base. Chipotle: Chipotle’s success is founded in the company’s commitment to freshness and integrity. This concept is not only communicated through advertisements, but in the experience itself. You watch as employees cook the meat for your perfectly wrapped burrito, and are only separated from the action by a glass partition. There’s a reason that we continue to hear other restaurants described as “the chipotle of” sushi, sandwiches, etc. Shake Shack: Shake Shack built its Millennial base by boosting their social media efforts. The fine-casual burger joint has expanded beyond just Facebook and Twitter, and engages with consumers on Vine, Pinterest, Instagram and Youtube. With only 65 locations worldwide, Shake Shack has the biggest social audience for its size, which is proof of the power of replying to consumers. In addition to its social presence, Shake Shack’s edgy and modern design in conjunction with its commitment to fresh and real ingredients have positioned the chain for growth. Whole Foods: This list wouldn’t be complete without the addition of the country’s largest natural supermarket chain. Whole Foods has truly redefined the experience of grocery shopping, and created an experience about more than buying food. Employees engage with customers in a hip and eclectic vibe, and are eager to help them navigate the...
Smorgasburg’s New Vendors

Smorgasburg’s New Vendors

With summer just around the corner, Smorgasburg has summer new vendors that already have us getting hungry. From paratha tacos, to spaghetti burgers, to house-cured bacon and homemade mozzarella there’s a lot to get your tummy rumbling. Here’s a sneak peak of what’s to come this summer: Smorgasburg is back outside with (we think) our best lineup yet. We received 300+ applications and spent the winter tasting dishes from pros and amateurs alike. We hosted over 100 tastings and selected a handful of new vendors to join the market. Here’s what’s new this spring: Antica Pesa: Owner Francesco Panella serves up three items not on the menu at his popular Williamsburg restaurant: Frittata di pasta (think spaghetti burger), eggplant parmagiana and pizza bianca. Best Buds Burritos: San Diego-style burritos stuffed with carne asada, fresh guacamole, crema, cheese, salsa and *french fries*. Big Mozz x Atlantic Ave. Co.: Mozzarella cheese made onsite served on a sandwich (with yummy roast pork) or as a “bomb”: a mini-ball injected with homemade lemony pesto. Birds & Bubbles: Nashville hot chicken on a biscuit with deviled egg sauce and dill pickle slices. From the popular LES chicken and champagne restaurant. The Cardinal Bakery: Vegetable/vegetarian sandwiches on homemade bread. Plus, chewy PB&J cookies. Curd’s the Word: Beer-battered Chicago-style cheese curds. Lots of sauces. Dorset Maple Reserve: Small-batch syrup by the bottle produced in southern Vermont, along with maple-sugar candy, maple caramel corn and bacon-maple candies. Duck Season: Duck confit (whole leg/thigh) served on the bone or in a sandwich with duck crackling. Order with a side of duck-fat-fried new potatoes. Goa-Taco: Fusion tacos served on Indian paratha bread...
Did You Know Kroger is the Largest Sushi Retailer in America?

Did You Know Kroger is the Largest Sushi Retailer in America?

Neither did we – but that may point to the reasons why the Cincinnati-based retail chain is flourishing. With sales at $108.5 billion in fiscal 2014, Mike Ellis, the president of Kroger, takes a particularly positive stance and in saying “it’s a good time for grocery stores.” On a streak of 44 consecutive quarters of same-store sales growth, Kroger attributes its success to keeping pace with change. By offering quality, value and convenience, the chain is focused on giving consumers what they want. “It’s not generic products like it was 30 years when I started with Kroger,” says Mike Scholtman, SVP and chief financial officer. “At the end of the day, we don’t have a preference for what they buy.” Instead, Kroger is focused on figuring out what shoppers want and a way to give them more of it. This strategy relies on three platforms: making organic accessible, reinventing prepared foods and delivering with digital. With natural bargains, an array of sushi and artisan cheese, and online shopping or delivery, Kroger is redefining the grocery store experience. Read the whole article from Food Business News...