The Importance of Package Design

The Importance of Package Design

Did you know how much good packaging can drive sales and build customer loyalty? In a recent study, Affinnova found that 36% of customers selected their purchase based on package design, which accounts for a larger share than traditional marketing strategies such as television ads and endorsements. 64% of consumers try a new product because of the package design. That makes good packaging a secret weapon for emerging brands, and a cannot-miss for established brands looking to safeguard their market share. 41% of consumers purchase a product again because of packaging. This is proof that package design isn’t a gimmick that drives one-time sales, but a powerful tool for encouraging brand loyalty. Grocery brands need to pay attention to package design. Consumer perceptions of brands can change based on a competitor’s package design changing, so it’s important to keep monitoring shelf changes. Affinnova documents the effect a central image on a package can have for brand success. In its evaluation of energy drinks, brands such as Red Bull and Monster, which have a recognizable central image, fared better than brands such as Coke’s NOS. Coke poured a staggering amount of money into NOS marketing, but its sales results and consumer appeal have lagged behind other energy drinks. Affinnova found that in the flavored sparkling water market, Sparkling ICE has appealed to consumers as being a healthy alternative to carbonated soft drinks. Sparkling ICE’s label has a “zero calories” strip next to its advertised benefit, being enriched with vitamins and antioxidants. Consumers seem eager to switch to products with clear health benefits. In the market for water enhancers, Affinnova noted...
Word Up

Word Up

To stand out to shoppers in a chaotic retail environment – packaging has to make a visual statement, and up until now, those statements were predominantly made through appetizing visuals and colorful, bold or unexpected design – but now we’re seeing brands make statements at shelf through…well, statements. Its genius really.  What’s the best way to appeal to shoppers overwhelmed with choice at shelf?  To accommodate them by making it easier to make sense of the options the see – by abandoning traditional hierarchy of logo-variety-features and leading with “hey, here’s why you might want to come over here.” Here’s some examples we’re seeing pop up. Coincidentally, when you lead with words that present something big, beguiling, useful or entertaining, all other packaging appears boring, subdued and conventional. Interact on Shelf is a design firm that works exclusively with grocery brands. What makes us different is that we study consumer culture, design trends, industry innovation and many other dynamics that shape opportunities for your brand in order to create iconic work that’s designed to sell in a retail environment. If you think you could benefit from partnering with a young, energetic bunch like us, you know what to do.  Contact us!  ...
How to Use Food Trends to Predict the Next Big Ingredient

How to Use Food Trends to Predict the Next Big Ingredient

In today’s world, food trends can come from unexpected places. No one would have predicted that kale, a leafy vegetable used to spice up butcher’s case displays, would enter the mainstream food world as an ingredient in everything from salads to smoothies to chips. However, anticipating in-vogue ingredients is often as simple as figuring out how to use overlooked edible byproducts. Today the style is to consume as much of an animal or vegetable as possible, or ‘full utilization.’ That means that even commonplace foods, such as carrot leaves or bone marrow, can be the source of a new ingredient. Following new trends and making products based on them will appeal to people who want to eat responsibly and reduce food product waste. Often, these parts of animals or plants have an intriguing taste that can enhance a recipe, and the reason that they are overlooked is simply because no one thinks to use them. How many people know that carrot leaves can be used in cooking? Restaurants have a financial incentive to make as little waste as possible, and the culinary chops to make these unique ingredients work in a recipe. As always, the cutting-edge restaurants set a precedent for food products, bringing certain ingredients into the public eye and demonstrating how to make them appealing. What they’re serving could signal the start of a new ingredient trend in food products. Just because an ingredient has its fifteen minutes of fame doesn’t mean it will fade into obscurity. In fact, the goal may be for it to fade into obscurity as long as ‘obscurity’ signals passage into the...
Using Clear Packaging to Boost Food Sales

Using Clear Packaging to Boost Food Sales

A new Wall Street Journal Article highlights the sales benefits of putting food in clear packaging. It describes the successes many companies have had in increasing sales, but also the problems they have faced when switching over. Clear packaging is a way to showcase food and to convey transparency: what you see is what you get. Customers associate clear packaging with natural, appealing, fresh products, even when the recipe hasn’t changed. Companies have blown past their competition just by changing the look of the product and the amount of visibility. But clear packaging isn’t always an easy fix to boost sales. Here are some of the problems companies have faced when designing clear packaging: 1. The product still has to look good on shelves after it’s been shipped and stocked. It also has to look good in different display environments. What looks great in a natural grocery store with climate control may not look appealing on a gas station counter in direct sunlight. 2. Clear packaging has to preserve the product for its shelf life, in all environments where the product is sold. Given that light degrades food, this poses design problems that go beyond the superficial. It’s also why some types of food do not look better in clear packages. 3. Showing too much can be bad. No one wants to see the empty space at the top of a sealed package, or the chip crumbs at the bottom of the bag. Graphics, see-through windows, and other adjustments can help, but stay away from revealing products that look factory made or messy. 4. Since more companies have been...