Are You Tough Enough to Make Your Grocery Product a Success?

Are You Tough Enough to Make Your Grocery Product a Success?

Having a great product and a great package may be the easiest part. The really hard part is next. You need to make sure you are tough enough to sell. The hard part is doing whatever it takes to start selling.  Whether it is fighting to get on shelf or endlessly finding outlets to get your product in the hands of consumers, it takes not just energy but toughness. This article from the New York Times about the beginnings Coconut Water will give you an idea of how tough you need to be. Interact on Shelf is a design firm that works exclusively with grocery brands. What makes us different is that we study consumer culture, design trends, industry innovation and many other dynamics that shape opportunities for your brand in order to create iconic work that’s designed to sell in a retail environment. If you think you could benefit from partnering with a young, energetic bunch like us, you know what to do.  Contact us! By Blake...
How to Get Your Grocery Product on Shelf

How to Get Your Grocery Product on Shelf

Getting a grocery buyer to authorize your product can be one of the toughest challenges for a small to medium size brand. If consumers can’t find your product on the shelf, they can’t buy your product. Having a better product alone won’t get you on shelf. Yes your product should be better and you should passionately believe in it. Most new products are not really new products or ideas. They are simply better versions of existing products. If a buyer authorizes your product and more people buy your product instead of an existing product that really doesn’t help the buyer. The buyer is measured on the performance of his category, a large part of which is growth. How many more dollars does his department sell year over year? Just having a consumer buy your product instead of another may help you, but it doesn’t help the buyer. Category growth is the key to getting your grocery product on shelf. You need think about how your product will bring new people into the category. You need to gather facts on why more consumers are looking for your product. For example, the first organic mustard would probably bring more health conscious into his mustard department. In addition to your facts and figures, you need a great story. Buyers are also consumers. While they may try to act like “just the facts” rationale business people, their emotions and gut also sway them. The result of your story, should “just make sense” to the buyer. To get the buyer to say yes, focus on how your product will help him grow his category...
Who controls the price of your grocery product?   

Who controls the price of your grocery product?  

Once your product is on shelf, price is often the single largest factor that determines your success.  Sometimes you control the price and sometimes you don’t. 4 pricing issues 1.  You look at the category and pick a price position that is usually premium, middle of the pack or the economy brand.  If you choose premium, you also consider the real or perceived price ceiling that you believe exists for the category.  You decide whether to respect that ceiling or to beak through it at the expense of volume and the benefit of brand image. 2.  You decide whether to hold firm on your prices and resist the temptation to offer deals and pressure from the buyer. The buyer may decide to put it on deal himself. 3. You work with the buyer to offer deals on your products.  This can work, if you have thought through why you are doing it.  Too often it’s just the belief of the brand and the buyer that a lower price is always better.  If you are simply rewarding people who would buy anyway, a price deal is leaving money on the table. Cutting prices can also become addictive at the expense of the brand image. If consumers see you frequently on sale, they may just delay a purchase until the next time you are on sale. Sale prices also attract consumers who have little brand loyalty on switch brands depending on who has the lowest price.  Do you really want these customers? 4. Your competition is on sale.  You have no control over this and may very well over react to...
The Power of Culture in Food Brands

The Power of Culture in Food Brands

Finding something worthwhile for a brand to share with the world beyond a commercial or tagline or product attribute is an uncommon talent. One formula that’s always worked, take a concept or interest popular in culture and attach your brand to it. Here, Meow Mix turns Kickstarter into CatStarter inviting fanatical cat owners to vote on both functional and completely ridiculous inventions for the brand to bring to market. Want to have a larger place in the world’s hearts and mind? Start participating in culture. Interact on Shelf is a design firm that works exclusively with grocery brands. What makes us different is that we study consumer culture, design trends, industry innovation and many other dynamics that shape opportunities for your brand in order to create iconic work that’s designed to sell in a retail environment. If you think you could benefit from partnering with a young, energetic bunch like us, you know what to do.  Contact us! By Blake...